U.S. Defines Who Can Enter Under Travel Ban

NBC News
June 29, 2017

The State Department on Thursday determined who will be allowed into the U.S. following the Supreme Court’s decision earlier this week to uphold large parts of President Donald Trump’s travel ban against visitors from six predominantly Muslim countries. 

Visa applicants from those six countries — Iran, Sudan, Syria, Libya, Somalia and Yemen — must prove a relationship with a parent, spouse, child, adult son or daughter, son-in-law, daughter-in-law or sibling already in the U.S. to enter the country, two State Department officials confirmed to NBC News.

In addition, all existing visas will still be honored, State Department officials confirmed.

The latest guidelines will take effect at 8:00 p.m. ET Thursday, but further legal challenges are expected.

The State Department on Thursday determined who will be allowed into the U.S. following the Supreme Court’s decision earlier this week to uphold large parts of President Donald Trump’s travel ban against visitors from six predominantly Muslim countries.

Visa applicants from those six countries — Iran, Sudan, Syria, Libya, Somalia and Yemen — must prove a relationship with a parent, spouse, child, adult son or daughter, son-in-law, daughter-in-law or sibling already in the U.S. to enter the country, two State Department officials confirmed to NBC News.

In addition, all existing visas will still be honored, State Department officials confirmed.

The latest guidelines will take effect at 8:00 p.m. ET Thursday, but further legal challenges are expected.

Related: Who Will Be Affected by the Supreme Court’s Travel Ban Ruling?

The newly released determination, issued via diplomatic cable Wednesday night, clarifies what qualifies as a “bona fide relationship with a person or entity in the United States” — critical but vague language that was part of the high court’s ruling on Monday on the ban.

Image: An Iraqi family welcomes their grandmother at Dulles International Airport
An Iraqi family from Woodbridge, Virginia, welcomes their grandmother at Dulles International Airport in Sterling, Virginia, on Feb. 5. Astrid Riecken / EPA file

In that decision, the justices ruled that Trump’s ban could partly take effect until the court makes a final ruling later this year.

In issuing its ruling Monday, the Supreme Court overturned a series of lower court rulings to green-light enforcement of much of Trump’s executive order, marking an important legal victory for the White House after a string of defeats over the issue and temporarily imposing tough restrictions on travel from the six countries and the entry of all refugees until the court hears the case in October.

News of the State Department determination was first reported by The Associated Press.

About admin 2803 Articles
America Talks With David Zublick is temporarily on hiatus. We will return with an all new show in 2018 which will be a video podcast available for download as an audio show as well. Stay tuned to this website for further details.

Be the first to comment

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published.


*